A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks)


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Facebook Instagram Twitter. Sign In Register Help Basket 0. Basket 0 items. Toggle navigation. Note: Cover may not represent actual copy or condition available. O'Callaghan Cornell University Press, Soft cover. Fine condition paperback,. Add to cart. Medieval Spain is brilliantly recreated, in all its variety and richness, in this comprehensive survey. Likely to become the standard work in English, the book treats the entire Iberian Peninsula and all the people who inhabited it, from the coming of the Visigoths in the fifth Excellent customer service. Prompt Customer Service.

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Return to Book Page. The Hispanic community of the Middle Ages is brilliantly recreated, in all its variety and richness, in this comprehensive survey. Likely to become the standard work in English, the book treats the entire Iberian Peninsula and all of the people who inhabited it, from the coming of the Visigoths to the reign of Ferdinand and Isabella.


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Integrating a wealth of information abou The Hispanic community of the Middle Ages is brilliantly recreated, in all its variety and richness, in this comprehensive survey. Integrating a wealth of information about the diverse peoples, institutions, religions, and customs that flourished in the states that are now Spain and Portugal, Professor O'Callaghan focuses on the continuing attempts to impose political unity on the peninsula.

He divides his story into five compact historical periods and discusses political, social, economic, and cultural developments in each period.

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By treating states together, he is able to put into proper perspective the relationship among them, their similarities and differences, and the continuity of development from one period to the next. He gives proper attention to Spain's contacts with the rest of the medieval world, but his main concern is with the events and institutions on the peninsula itself.

Illustrations, genealogical charts, maps, and an extensive bibliography round out the book. It will be welcomed by teachers of Spanish and Portuguese history and literature, as well as by medievalists, as the fullest account to date of Spanish history in the Middle Ages. Get A Copy. Paperback , Cornell Paperbacks , pages. More Details Original Title. Other Editions 2.

Medieval Spain "The Reconquista"

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View 1 comment. May 01, Loring Wirbel rated it it was amazing. A historian is both lucky and talented when confronted with a broad subject of which very little is known; when the historian can develop a captivating narrative to handle such wide realms; and when the chronicler writes well enough for readers to care. O'Callaghan succeeds in all three cases in this unique book.

In North America, the knowledge of pre-Reconquista Spain, even among history buffs, is limited to a vague awareness that the Muslims conquered most of the peninsula some time in the eigh A historian is both lucky and talented when confronted with a broad subject of which very little is known; when the historian can develop a captivating narrative to handle such wide realms; and when the chronicler writes well enough for readers to care. In North America, the knowledge of pre-Reconquista Spain, even among history buffs, is limited to a vague awareness that the Muslims conquered most of the peninsula some time in the eighth century, leaving Christians a small sliver of Basque and Galician land, until they were chased out by Ferdinand and Isabella years later.

O'Callaghan not only makes these characters real, he begins before the Muslim conquests in AD.

A history of medieval Spain

He makes Visigoth kings like Rodrigo seem greater than their two-dimensional representations in most texts, and describes the Visigoth leaders as literate, competent administrators faced with much more primitive tribes like the Suevi and Alans. The new historical revisionism stresses that Islamic control of al-Andalus represented a special era of high culture and scientific inquiry in Medieval Europe, but O'Callaghan shows us that not all caliphates are created equal.

The Umayyad caliphate of the early conquest centuries was worth its reputation, but the later period of the Almoravid and Almohad factions represented a victory of puritanical Islamic caliphates not that different from Salafists in the modern world. While O'Callaghan does not have much use for Crusader-era Europe, he does show the odd ways that Northern Europe interacted with the besieged Iberian Christians - not just the well-known tale of Charlemagne crossing the Pyrenees to attack the Muslim infidels, but lesser known events such as the Black Prince Edward, Prince of Wales serving as a power broker in the 14th century.

While O'Callaghan does not try to take on Catholic myth-making directly, it is clear that he sees Pelayo's "discovery" of the bones of St.

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James in the ninth century as mere propaganda to encourage a new crusade. A surprising element of the book regarding Catholics and Spain is how little respect most rulers of the fractured kingdoms Castile, Aragon, Navarre seemed to have for papal orders, up until the time of the Ferdinand-Isabella marriage. For a region willing to submit itself to the absurd Inquisition and put up with Catholic nonsense far longer than the rest of Europe, the Spanish people of the pre era did not seem to pay much attention to the Vatican, outside of greeting pilgrims making their way to Santiago de Compostela.

When Spain got mixed up in The Great Schism in the early s, the only reasons any leader wanted to weigh in on three popes at once and the counter-cries of "Anti-pope," were for reasons of power and influence, not belief. The final few hundred pages can tax a reader's patience due to the fact that the Spanish regions were ruled from the time of the Black Death to the time of Ferdinand by a succession of kings named Pedro, Alfonso, Fernando, etc.

Let's face it, it's difficult to keep this straight, particularly with all the palace intrigue taking place in most of the regional kingdoms. One thing is clear for the time preceding the unification of modern Spain and Portugal: pogroms against Jews and Muslims did not begin with the expulsions of the late s. Even though Christians lived in harmony with Muslims and Jews for centuries in Spain, the economic hardships following the Black Death in the s got the blame-game rolling.

Citizens were ready to take independent action against Jews, and did so with fervor in the late s, and were not inclined to show much empathy for Muslims by the 15th century. O'Callaghan says his analysis of later Islamic kingdoms in Granada and elsewhere were limited by a lack of source material, though additional material has been uncovered since , as evidenced by books such as L.

Harvey's 'Islamic Spain This huge volume may be exhausting for those not deeply interested in Spain's roots - but it's hard to call it boring in any event. This is amazingly encyclopedic account of the history of the Iberian peninsula from Visigothic times to the end of the 15th century.


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While it may be getting a little dated, its narrative of the development of the kingdoms, societies and cultures of the region holds together thanks to Joseph O'Callaghan's clarity and his command of the sources. This is a book from which a reader can profit either by reading it cover-to-cover or by dipping into its clearly-delineated chapters, each of which can st This is amazingly encyclopedic account of the history of the Iberian peninsula from Visigothic times to the end of the 15th century.

This is a book from which a reader can profit either by reading it cover-to-cover or by dipping into its clearly-delineated chapters, each of which can stand alone as a mini-essay on their topic. If you're looking for a book on Spain during the Middle Ages, this is definitely an excellent place to start. Feb 07, Peter Corrigan rated it really liked it. Well, this seemed like a textbook and in fact it is a textbook, 'suitable for the undergraduate or graduate student seeking a reliable orientation to medieval peninsular history', according to the back cover.

And so it is, but what a history! There were times my eyes glossed over and fortunately there is no test coming from Professor O'Callaghan! The sheer number of Pedros, Alfonsos, Juans, Fernandos, Carlos, Jamies, Sanchos and other repetitive king names and occasional Juanas, Leonors and Jea Well, this seemed like a textbook and in fact it is a textbook, 'suitable for the undergraduate or graduate student seeking a reliable orientation to medieval peninsular history', according to the back cover.

The sheer number of Pedros, Alfonsos, Juans, Fernandos, Carlos, Jamies, Sanchos and other repetitive king names and occasional Juanas, Leonors and Jeannes among the ladies ruling, trying to rule, or overthrowing the various major empires often simultaneously in different adjacent emprires with the same names --Navarre, Leon, Castile, Aragon, Catalonia and Portugal, often becomes dizzying. The book is however very well organized into historical periods: The Visigoth Era AD with a brief prelude on the late Roman Empire of Hispania.

A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks) A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks)
A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks) A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks)
A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks) A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks)
A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks) A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks)
A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks) A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks)
A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks) A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks)
A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks) A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks)
A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks) A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks)
A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks) A History of Medieval Spain (Cornell Paperbacks)

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